History of the telephone book

Before the Internet, they were one of the most important tools for bringing people together.

NORFOLK, Va. – Long ago, telephone directories – big and bulky, yellow and white – were something we relied on almost every day.

Before the Internet, they were one of the most important tools for bringing family and friends, buyers and sellers together.

The yellow pages were used to find businesses and the white pages helped find people’s phone numbers and addresses.

In Virginia, the state required them to be distributed free by telephone companies, and many people looked forward to annual delivery in the 1980s and 1990s.

But in 2009, the internet connected us to everything we needed, and we turned our backs on our favorite four-book repertoire.

But it was probably for the best. When Verizon stopped publishing the White Pages in 2011, 1,640 tons of paper were saved statewide.

Nevertheless, yellow pages still exist and many of us receive them every year, despite research showing that most don’t even need or want them.

The latest study, done in 2011, showed that only 30% of Americans use a physical copy at home.

However, you can choose not to receive a physical copy by withdraw on line.

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